CW Bibliography: Primary Works

Bibliography of works by Charles Williams

Now that we have finished the Place of the Lion series and have discussed CW’s major themes, we are moving into another phase of material on this blog. This week and next are bibliographical in nature. After that, I will start posting summaries of each of CW’s books, in chronological order. Along the way, I will interject posts on events in his life, important people and influences, and so forth. That means that in three weeks, we will start the main purpose of this blog: posting through CW’s life and works in order for an in-depth look at everything he did, thought, and wrote. 1072632_10201505506582483_300234135_o

Today, here is a list of Williams’s primary works, grouped by genre. Before approaching this long list, you may want to read my Reader’s Guide for Beginners.

Novels
·
Shadows of Ecstasy. London: Victor Gollancz, 1933.
·
War in Heaven. London: Victor Gollancz, 1930.
·
Many Dimensions. London: Victor Gollancz, 1930.
·
The Place of the Lion. London: Mundanus, 1931.
·
The Greater Trumps. London: Victor Gollancz, 1932.
·
Descent into Hell. London: Faber & Faber, 1937.
·
All Hallow’s Eve. London: Faber & Faber, 1945.
·
The Noises That Weren’t There. Unfinished. First three chapters published in Mythlore 6 (Autumn 1970), 7 (Winter 1971) and 8 (Winter 1972).

Plays
· A Myth of Shakespeare. London OUP, 1928.
· A Myth of Francis Bacon. Published in  the Charles Williams Society Newsletter, 11, 12, and 14.
·
Three Plays. Oxford UP, 1931. Contains The Witch (1931), The Chaste Wanton (1930), and The Rite of the Passion (1929).
·
Collected Plays by Charles Williams, edited by John Heath-Stubbs. Oxford UP, 1963. Contains Thomas Cranmer of Canterbury (1935), Judgement at Chelmsford (1939), Seed of Adam (1936), The Death of Good Fortune (1939), The House by the Stable (1939), Grab and Grace (1941), House of the Octopus (1945), Terror of Light (1940), and The Three Temptations (1942).
·
The Masques of Amen House, edited by David Bratman. Mythopoeic Press, 2000. Contains The Masque of the Manuscript (1927), The Masque of Perusal (1929), The Masque of the Termination of Copyright (1930).

Poetry
·
The Silver Stair. London: Herbert and Daniel, 1912.
·
Poems of Conformity. Oxford UP, 1917.
·
Divorce. Oxford UP, 1920.
·
Windows of Night. Oxford UP, 1924.
·
Heroes and Kings. London: Sylvan Press, 1930.
·
Taliessin through Logres (1938) and The Region of the Summer Stars (1944). Oxford UP, 1954. Published in this Eerdmans collection along with the unfinished critical work The Figure of Arthur as part of Arthurian Torso (with C.S. Lewis’s commentary), Oxford UP, 1948. The poems were also published in 1991 together with Williams’s earlier Arthurian poetry in a volume entitled Charles Williams, edited by David Llewellyn Dodds, as part of Boydell & Brewer’s Arthurian Poets series.

Theology
·
He Came Down from Heaven. London: Heinemann, 1938.
·
The Descent of the Dove: A Short History of the Holy Spirit in the Church. London: Longmans, Green, 1939.
·
Witchcraft. London: Faber & Faber, 1941.
·
The Forgiveness of Sins. London: G. Bles, 1942
. Outlines of Romantic Theology. Eerdmans, 1990.

Literary Criticism
·
Poetry at Present. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1930.
·
The English Poetic Mind. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1932.
·
Reason and Beauty in the Poetic Mind. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1933.
·
The Figure of Beatrice. London: Faber & Faber, 1943.
·
The Image of the City and Other Essays, edited by Anne Ridler. Oxford UP, 1958.
·
The Detective Fiction Reviews of Charles Williams, edited by Jared C. Lobdell. McFarland, 2003.
·
Religion and Love in Dante: The Theology of Romantic Love. Pennsylvania: Folcroft Library Editions, 1974.

Biography
·
Bacon. London: Arthur Barker, 1933.
·
James I. London: Arthur Barker, 1934.
·
Rochester. London: Arthur Barker, 1935.
·
Queen Elizabeth. London: Duckworth, 1936.
·
Henry VII. London: Arthur Barker, 1937.
·
Stories of Great Names. Oxford UP, 1937.
·
Flecker of Dean Close. London: Canterbury Press, 1946.

“Other”
·
Letters to Lalage: The Letters of Charles Williams to Lois Lang-Sims. Kent State UP, 1989.
·
To Michal from Serge: Letters from Charles Williams to His Wife Florence, 1939-1945, edited by Roma King Jr. Kent State UP, 2002.
· short story, “Et in Sempiternum Pereant” in
The Oxford Book of English Ghost Stories, 1986.
· intro to Evelyn Underhill’s Letters
·
intro to the second edition of Gerard Manley Hopkins’s Poems
· introduction to Kierkegaard’s The Present Age (CW also worked to bring many more of Kierkegaard’s works into English)
· The Story of the Aeneid as retold by Williams
· selected daily readings in A New Christian Year and The Passion of Christ
· Many of Williams’s papers are housed at the Marion E. Wade Center.

Here is another bibliography online, and the official website of the Charles Williams Society is an indispensable resource for up-to-date information.

Thank you to David Llewellyn Dodds for additions to my original list.

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About Sørina Higgins

Sørina Higgins is a writer, English teacher, and Inklings scholar. Sørina serves as Chair of the Department of Language and Literature at Signum University and teaches English at King's College and Lehigh Carbon Community College. She has published two books of poetry, "The Significance of Swans" and "Caduceus."
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7 Responses to CW Bibliography: Primary Works

  1. David Llewellyn Dodds says:

    In terms of “primary” works, a case could be made for adding, under Plays, A Myth of Shakespeare (London: OUP, 1928) – and perhaps tossing in its little companion, “A Myth of Francis Bacon”, published in the Charles Williams Society Newsletter, 11, 12, and 14, for good measure. Outlines of Romantic Theology could lead the Theology section as earliest written, or close it as last published (Eerdmans, 1990).

    Moving further afield from “primary” works leaves things of varying interest and importance – for instance, among the 16 items in the “Other” section in the bibliography with my entry in the Dictionary of Literary Biography, volume 153, are his edition of Evelyn Underhill’s Letters, the second edition of Hopkins’s Poems, his introduction to Kierkegaard’s The Present Age, and The Story of the Aeneid as retold by Williams, as well as his rewarding series of daily readings in A New Christian Year and The Passion of Christ (now handily linked via the Williams Socirty site).

    Off line, Lawrence R. Dawson’s “A Checklist of Reviews by Charles Williams” in Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America, 55 (April/June 1961), 100-17, and Lois Glenn’s Charles W.S. Williams: A Checklist (Kent State U Press, 1975) are worth noting among bibliographical works.

    I might just add, I think the fullest account in print to date of what was published in Mythlore as The Noises that Weren’t There is that in my DLB entry, which identifies it as apparently the latest draft of the novel about “the Devil trying to beget Antichrist” synopsized in January 1941 and being draftd in 1943, which was both abandoned as such and supplied various elements to All Hallows’ Eve by October 1943.

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  2. David Llewellyn Dodds says:

    “Posting through CW’s life and works”: what a mind-boggling – and invigorating – project! Thank you for undertaking it, and all good wishes for it!

    Like

  3. Pingback: Chronological List of works by Charles Williams | The Oddest Inkling

  4. Pingback: Bibliography: Studies of Charles Williams and his work | The Oddest Inkling

  5. Pingback: Chronological List of works by Charles Williams | The Oddest Inkling

  6. Pingback: Bibliography: Studies of Charles Williams and his work | The Oddest Inkling

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